Category Archives for Secular Parenting

Reading with Little Bit: A Critical Look at The Chronicles of Narnia, Part Three

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe Chapter 5 “The professor totally knows about Narnia or he wouldn’t be saying this weird stuff, Mom.” “Yep. Just wait until The Magician’s Nephew.” “I thought so.” We last left off with Susan and Peter, the two oldest children, finally bringing their youngest siblings’ problems to the guy […]

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Reading with Little Bit: A Critical Look at The Chronicles of Narnia, Part 2

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The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe Chapters 1-4 “Oh, I do not like Edmund.” “No one does, honey.” Little Bit has patiently allowed me to explain the air raids of London during World War II before moving past the first paragraph of The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. This plot contrivance allows the […]

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Reading with Little Bit: A Critical Look at The Chronicles of Narnia – Introduction

By Alexis Record Magic spells, witches, and my devotedly conservative Christian parents are okay with it? Wow! I had a lot of restrictions growing up in the 80s and 90s during the height of my experience with evangelical culture. Leaders in our religious tradition considered many books, types of music, and television shows to be […]

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Instilling Shame and Guilt is Child Abuse

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Two of the many manipulative tools that religions use, particularly fundamentalist religions, are shame and guilt. Psychologists describe shame as an inward focus on what is wrong with ourselves and guilt as a more outward focus on what we did that was wrong.[1] While some posit that guilt can be constructive and allow us to […]

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Talking About Religion in Your Skeptical Family

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Guest Post by Karen Leothen I am certain that one of the most-Googled questions by atheist parents today is How to discuss religion with my children as an atheist or skeptic. That’s because many of them were raised in a religion and are trying to figure out just what to do. I used to do […]

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